ASX Share rice
Tue 11 Aug 2020 - 10:27:am (Sydney)

FLT Share Price

FLIGHT CENTRE TRAVEL GROUP LIMITEDFLTConsumer Services

FLT Company Information

Name:

Flight Centre Travel Group Limited

Sector:

Consumer Cyclical

Industry:

Travel Services

GIC Industry:

Hotels, Restaurants & Leisure

GIC Sub Industry:

Hotels, Resorts & Cruise Lines

Address:

275 Grey Street Brisbane QLD Australia 4101

Phone:

61 7 3083 0088

Full Time Employees:

19993

Founder, Global MD, CEO & Exec. Director:

Mr. Graham F. Turner

Chief Financial Officer:

Mr. Adam Campbell

Chief Exec. Officer of Corp. Bus.:

Mr. Chris Galanty

Chief Exec. Officer of Leisure Bus.:

Ms. Melanie C. Waters-Ryan

Founder:

Mr. Geoff Harris

Company Overview:

Flight Centre Travel Group Limited provides travel retailing services for the leisure, corporate, and wholesale travel sectors in Australia, New Zealand, Europe, the Middle East, Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Internationally. The company offers leisure travel services for the niche sectors, as well as mass, youth, premium, and cruise markets; and corporate travel services for organizations of various sizes across industries. It also supplies products to its national and international network, or travel retail outlets. In addition, the company offers other travel related services, including foreign currency exchange and travel academies; recruitment marketing and bike retailing; and employee benefit services. It provides its services primarily under the Flight Centre brand, as well as other travel brands, such as Student Flights, Travel Associates, My Adventure Travel, Liberty Travel, Infinity Holidays, GOGO Vacations, FCm Travel Solutions, Corporate Traveller, Stage and Screen, cievents, and Campus Travel. The company was formerly known as Flight Centre Limited and changed its name to Flight Centre Travel Group Limited in November 2013. Flight Centre Travel Group Limited was incorporated in 1987 and is headquartered in Brisbane, Australia.

FLT Share Price Information

Shares Issued:

199.02M

Market Capitalisation:

$2.23B

Dividend per Share:

$1.96

Ex Dividend Date:

2020-03-26

Dividend Yield:

17.52%

Revenue (TTM):

$3.14B

Revenue Per Share (TTM):

$31.13

Earnings per Share:

$1.979

Profit Margin:

0.064

Operating Margin (TTM):

$0.10

Return On Assets (TTM):

$0.06

Return On Equity (TTM):

$0.14

Quarterly Revenue Growth (YOY):

0.058

Gross Profit(TTM):

$1.31B

Diluted Earnings Per Share (TTM):

$1.979

QuarterlyEarnings Growth(YOY):

-0.742

FLT CashFlow Statement

CashFlow Date:

2019-06-30

Investments:

$-218,302,000

Change To Liabilities:

$-26,576,000

Total Cashflow From Investing Activities:

$-218,302,000

Net Borrowings:

$148.69M

Net Income:

$263.83M

Total Cash From Operating Activities:

$278.88M

Depreciation:

$64.16M

Other Cashflow From Investing Activities:

$107K

Dividends Paid:

$-319,787,000

Change To Inventory:

$-34,000

Change To Account Receivables:

$-38,516,000

Sale Purchase Of Stock:

$-9,837,000

Capital Expenditures:

$100.98M

FLT Income Statement

Income Date:

2019-06-30

Income Before Tax:

$343.46M

Net Income:

$263.83M

Gross Profit:

$2.90B

Operating Income:

$342.44M

Other Operating Expenses:

$446.05M

Interest Expense:

$25.59M

Income Tax Expense:

$79.28M

Total Revenue:

$3.06B

Total Operating Expenses:

$2.56B

Cost Of Revenue:

$157.23M

FLT Balance Sheet

Balance Sheet Date:

2019-06-30

Intangible Assets:

$170M

Total Liabilities:

$2.03B

Total Stockholder Equity:

$1.46B

Other Current Liabilities:

$15.40M

Total Assets:

$3.49B

Common Stock:

$405.63M

Other Current Assets:

$427.64M

Retained Earnings:

$1.05B

Other Liabilities:

$116.12M

Good Will:

$598.64M

Other Assets:

$91.62M

Cash:

$1.18B

Total Current Liabilities:

$1.76B

Short-Term Debt:

$84.71M

Property - Plant & Equipment:

$239.87M

Net Tangible Assets:

$693.41M

Long-Term Investments:

$93.26M

Total Current Assets:

$2.31B

Long-Term Debt:

$100.38M

Net Receivables:

$572.94M

Short-Term Investments:

$1.19B

Inventory:

$1.64M

Accounts Payable:

$485.46M

Non Currrent Assets (Other):

$11.54M

Short-Term Investments:

$1.19

Non Current Liabilities (Other):

$3.18M

Non Current Liabilities Total:

$276.02M

FLT Share Price History

FLT News

30 Jul, 2020
(Bloomberg Opinion) -- In folklore, the will-o’-the-wisp is a spirit that lives in marshlands, beckoning night-time travelers with its mysterious light until they stumble in darkness to their demise.The phenomenon is thought to be caused by igniting swamp methane, so it’s oddly appropriate that one of the world’s largest exporters of such fossil gas seems intent on pursuing that industry to its own destruction. An Australian task force on helping the manufacturing industry recover from Covid-19 will recommend subsidies for gas infrastructure and bringing in the government as a guaranteed buyer if commercial customers don’t show sufficient demand, the Sydney Morning Herald and Age newspapers reported Wednesday.That’s an extraordinarily bad idea. Australia’s determination to use taxpayer funds to bring uncommercial gas projects online has helped swell a glut of methane in the seaborne trade over the past decade as operators including Chevron Corp., Santos Ltd., Origin Energy Ltd., Royal Dutch Shell Plc, and Woodside Petroleum Ltd. built plants capable of exporting more than 100 billion cubic meters a year. That oversupply has pushed spot prices for Asian liquefied natural gas as low as $2 per million British thermal units this year, an 80% drop on levels that prevailed a decade ago. Despite its own surging exports, that hasn’t been a win for Australia.While exports of oil and LNG now total around A$60 billion ($43 billion) a year, an immense tax offset granted to builders of export facilities worth nearly a quarter of a trillion dollars has ensured that revenues from petroleum taxes average little more than A$1 billion annually. Qatar, which is still marginally ahead as the world’s biggest LNG exporter, has built an entire economy on petroleum royalties. Australia, on the other hand, makes more than twice as much from beer excise tax.The building of the current crop of export facilities sparked a jobs boom nearly a decade ago, but that dissipated once construction ceased. Employment in oil and gas production now totals about 20,500 people. Bookings agent Flight Centre Travel Group Ltd. has a workforce about the same size as Australia’s entire upstream petroleum industry.To be sure, oil and gas extraction is now a significant sector, accounting for about A$44 billion of gross value added per year. Still, the 2.3% of gross domestic product looks like a poor return on the decades of industrial policy that were needed to develop it.The current push for further subsidies is likely to make a bad problem worse. It’s a priority for a manufacturing task force because the previous gas projects on the populous east coast were designed entirely for export, starving industry of the artificially cheap fuel that some countries (and the remote state of Western Australia) reserve for domestic use.But Australia’s industrial sector is never going to be a powerhouse worthy of such interventions. Labor costs are too high and its location too remote from global supply chains for the country to be a significant player in large-scale complex manufacturing, as demonstrated by the collapse of its car industry over the past decade.Any set-aside gas generated as a result of the proposed policies is most likely to end up used in low-value applications like explosives and fertilizer. Together. these account for just a percentage point or so of goods exports, which don’t include major services exports such as tourism and education. At a time when the European Union and Joe Biden’s presidential campaign are looking at imposing tariffs or quotas on carbon-intensive imports, the idea that gas-fired manufacturing will lead to a renaissance of Australian industry seems delusional.The ultimate problem is that from the perspective of global petroleum companies, Australia’s relatively high costs put its potential projects outside the range of viable investments — and that field is already narrowing, thanks to the recent collapse in oil prices and rise of electrified transport.Only government spending and tax shields are capable of shifting Australian projects far enough down the cost curve to make sense, but that means that they’ll always be marginal and dependent on ongoing support. A typical 30-year gas project starting development in 2020 would face challenges to getting financed in a world that hopes to eliminate carbon emissions by 2050, but plenty of projects still manage. Indeed, the 96 billion cubic meters of new LNG capacity signed off last year was a record.Investors are quite capable of finding the rare fossil fuel projects that are strong enough to make a return in a de-carbonizing world. The trouble is, it’s not seeing them in Australia. Rather than using taxpayer money to put its thumb on those scales, Australia would be better stepping back and letting the market decide.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.David Fickling is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities, as well as industrial and consumer companies. He has been a reporter for Bloomberg News, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and the Guardian.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.
15 Jul, 2020
Despite the potential loss of nearly 200 million travel and tourism jobs this year under Covid-19-generated, worst-case scenarios, some travel companies around the world are still hiring. Sure, the daily torrent of headlines, including United Airlines considering cutting 36,000 jobs and Skyscanner lopping off 300 positions in the past week, is unrelenting. And we are […]
26 Jun, 2020
We often see insiders buying up shares in companies that perform well over the long term. The flip side of that is...
10 May, 2020
Private equity firm Carlyle Group and Singapore sovereign wealth fund GIC are pulling out of a deal to invest in American Express Global Business Travel, a corporate travel booking service that is 50 percent-owned by American Express, according to published reports.  The investment would have given Carlyle and GIC a 20 percent stake in American […]
25 Mar, 2020
SYDNEY/CHICAGO, March 26 (Reuters) - Delta Air Lines Inc and Air New Zealand Ltd said they would offer cargo charter services on passenger planes to boost revenue as the U.S. Senate neared a vote on a bill to give its carriers $58 billion in aid, including payroll support. The passenger travel industry has been decimated by the coronavirus pandemic, with Australia's Flight Centre Travel Group Ltd on Thursday announcing plans to cut 6,000 travel agent roles globally, either temporarily or permanently.
24 Mar, 2020
Half Year 2020 Flight Centre Travel Group Ltd Earnings Call
13 Mar, 2020
SYDNEY/CHICAGO March 13 (Reuters) - The fallout from the coronavirus spread across the Pacific on Friday, with travel companies in Australia and New Zealand issuing profit warnings as U.S. airlines rushed to cut flights to Europe in the wake of new U.S. travel restrictions. U.S. travel curbs on much of continental Europe announced by President Donald Trump on Wednesday evening deepened the sector's misery that began after the virus emerged in China late last year and reduced traffic. United Airlines Holdings Inc warned of U.S. travel disruption as the virus spreads domestically and major tourist attractions like Walt Disney Co's theme parks in California and Florida said they would close.
04 Mar, 2020
CHICAGO/SYDNEY, March 4 (Reuters) - The rapid spread of coronavirus cases worldwide is complicating a standard strategy used by airlines when disease, disaster or conflict hit travel destinations: lower fares and redirect flights to trouble-free areas. For now, some airlines have resorted to suspending change fees for new ticket reservations in the hope of winning over hesitant travelers until it becomes clearer where coronavirus outbreaks are localized and which routes could benefit from price drops. The coronavirus, which emerged in the central Chinese city of Wuhan late last year, has spread around the world, with more new cases now appearing outside China than inside.
CHICAGO/SYDNEY, March 4 (Reuters) - The rapid spread of coronavirus cases worldwide is complicating a standard strategy used by airlines when disease, disaster or conflict hit travel destinations: lower fares and redirect flights to trouble-free areas. For now, some airlines have resorted to suspending change fees for new ticket reservations in the hope of winning over hesitant travelers until it becomes clearer where coronavirus outbreaks are localized and which routes could benefit from price drops. The coronavirus, which emerged in the central Chinese city of Wuhan late last year, has spread around the world, with more new cases now appearing outside China than inside.
28 Feb, 2020
There's been a notable change in appetite for Flight Centre Travel Group Limited (ASX:FLT) shares in the week since...
05 Feb, 2020
The CEO of Flight Centre Travel Group Limited (ASX:FLT) is Skroo Turner. This report will, first, examine the CEO...
13 Jan, 2020
Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility...
24 Dec, 2019
One of the best investments we can make is in our own knowledge and skill set. With that in mind, this article will...
05 Dec, 2019
While Flight Centre Travel Group Limited (ASX:FLT) shareholders are probably generally happy, the stock hasn't had...
04 Dec, 2019
Air India, Alitalia and South African Airways (SAA) — are running out of options to remain aloft. After several attempts to sell Air India, Prime Minister Narendra Modi's government is considering a change to airline ownership restrictions that currently require that operational control rest with Indian nationals, according to Indian media reports. The requirement has been a major stumbling block to the government's ability to sell the carrier, which is shouldering about $9 billion of debt.
29 Nov, 2019
Two big travel insurance companies in South Africa have stopped covering tickets issued by South African Airways (SAA) against insolvency as doubts grow about whether the struggling state-owned airline can survive. While the move is unlikely to push SAA into liquidation by itself, it will hurt ticket sales and exacerbate a cash crunch that left the airline unable to pay salaries on time this month, analysts said.
27 Nov, 2019
Full Year 2019 Flight Centre Travel Group Ltd Earnings Call

FLT Dividend Payments

EX-Date Dividend Amount
2010-03-04$0.2600
2010-09-10$0.4400
2011-03-06$0.3600
2011-09-12$0.4800
2012-03-08$0.4100
2012-09-17$0.7100
2013-03-21$0.4600
2013-09-16$0.9100
2014-03-23$0.5500
2014-09-17$0.9700
2015-03-24$0.5500
2015-09-16$0.9700
2016-03-22$0.6000
2016-09-15$0.9200
2017-03-21$0.4500
2017-09-14$0.8462
2018-03-21$0.5401
2018-09-13$0.9632
2019-03-20$1.3413
2019-09-12$0.8822
2020-03-25$0.4000

FLT Dividends (last 11 Years)